Tag Archives: Parrot Playgyms

Holiday Gifts for your Bird

3125980585_ea3db0e9a9_bThe Holiday Season is upon us and it’s time to get your Feathered Friends their Holiday gifts…….what a tough decision.  There is so much to choose from.  Here are some ideas to help you get the best gift for your Feathered Friend this Holiday Season.

Birds just love new bird toys……nothing better than a new bird toy that is ready to be chewed, torn and tossed about their home.

All birds need time outside their homes…..how about their very own Parrot Playgym……now that is a cool idea.

How about some Educational Bird toys that will keep your bird entertained for hours?

If your bird only loves certain bird toys……how about making him/her a handmade bird toy(s) with some Bird Toy Making Parts?

Does your bird need a new cage?……..How about some Full Spectrum Lighting by Featherbrite this season?

FunTime Birdy wishes you and your Feathered Friends a joyous Holiday Season!!!

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Vinny the Timneh African Grey Loves his FunTime Birdy FunStation Playgym

Vinny on his new FunStation Play Gym

Vinny the Timneh African Grey loves his FunTime Birdy FunStation Playgym.

Here is what Vinny’s Mom Mary K. had to say:

Hey Ann we got the playgym today and it is beautiful!! Vinny, Giz, Zeus and Pooh will love it. Vinny is the only one on it so far and he loves his new playgym. We sent you an email with the photo. Hope you got it! Thanks!!

Thanks Mary for the great photo of Vinny!!!- Ann Zych – FunTime Birdy

Adopting a Rescue Bird

For Flapping FeathersParrots can make wonderful companions and pets. However, not everyone is cut out to be a bird owner. There is a lot of responsibility, dedication and cost involved. Being a good parrot owner entails more than simply feeding your bird every day and placing a couple of parrot toys  in their cage. Some people are not fully prepared for the demands of caring for a parrot before they rush out and buy one. As a result, many birds end up in shelters or rescues, looking for a new family. This is a sad situation for any bird, since rescue parrots can be hard to place.

There are many reasons people give up their parrots. These include:

•    Lack of Time: Most birds need more than a bird cage . They need human interaction. They need you to take them out of their cage and play with them on their parrot playgym or bird stand. They need your time and attention. With today’s hectic lifestyle, many people discover that they do not have time to care for a parrot.

•    Lack of Money: Parrots can be expensive to care for. If you have a large parrot, you will need to invest in a sizeable birdcage, which can be costly. Food, treats and parrot toys can also add up quickly. Not to mention trips to the veterinarian and any medications, vitamins or supplements your bird will need.

•    Life Changes: A move, new job or new baby can add up to a lot of demands, leaving little or no energy for a parrot.  If you are considering purchasing your first feathered friend, or if you simply want to add to your feathered flock, you may want to consider giving a dislocated parrot a good home. That being said—you should be prepared for the challenges of raising and caring for an adopted feathered friend. Not everyone is up for the task. Here are a few things to ask yourself:
•    Do you have a lot of patience? Oftentimes, rescue birds have been neglected and abused. As a result, they may have behavioral difficulties and trust issues. These parrots need a lot of time, attention and love to regain their trust in people. Initially, you may have to spend double the amount of time with a rescue parrot, as you would with one you already own. You may also need to help your feathered friend overcome behavioral issues such as feather-plucking, biting or constant screaming. This process will take time and patience.

•    Do you have experience with birds? The more experience and knowledge you have, the better. It will give you a tremendous edge when working with rescue birds. However, even if you are a new parrot owner, as long as you are dedicated, aware of the challenges and have experienced people to help you out, you will do fine.

Not all rescue birds are aggressive, sullen or mistrustful. Some come from good homes that simply cannot care for them anymore. However, you never know what you will get. Go in with both eyes open—be committed and willing to help the feathered friend you choose.

Take an Additional 10 Percent Off at FunTime Birdy

Now until August 15th…..Take an Additional 10% Off your order.

Big Savings on Bird Toys, Parrot Playgyms, Bird Perches, Educational Bird Toys, Foraging Bird Toys and More!!!!

Save 10% to 35% plus an Additional 10% Off.  Use Code FTBTEN at checkout.  (discount does not apply to Cages, Mango Stands, Featherbrite lights, and Crystal Flight Carriers)

FunTime Birdy Sale Page for Bird Toys, Parrot Playgyms and More!

Summer Sale at FunTime Birdy on Bird Toys, Parrot Playgyms and More

Banner 1 June 2013

Our Summer Sale has begun…..it’s going to be a hot one!!! Big Savings on Bird Toys, Parrot Playgyms, Bird Perches and More!!!!

Happy Shopping

Ann – FunTime Birdy

Should You Feed Your Parrot Table Scraps?

Parrot EatingSharing food with your parrot can enhance the bonding process. Just like most parrots enjoy playing with bird toys—they also love to eat. Food is a wonderful way to gain your parrot’s trust and loyalty. However, you will want to consider what foods are appropriate for parrots and what is not. In general, parrots can eat almost anything people do, with some limitations.
If your parrot enjoys sharing dinner with you while on his bird stand or parrot playgym, keep the choices simple and healthy!! Most pastas, bread and cereals are safe for birds. Fresh or cooked fruits and veggies are also excellent choices –just avoid feeding your bird too many onions as this can cause anemia or digestive upsets.

Foods to Avoid

Chocolate is a definite no-no for pet birds. Even though your parrot may be staring at you with round, wishful eyes as you devour a piece of chocolate cake or fudge brownies—resist the temptation to share this delicacy with your bird. Chocolate can be extremely toxic causing illness and even death in most pets. Salt is another food that should be given in moderation. Too much salt can be hard on the kidneys. Avoid feeding your parrot highly processed or boxed foods, which tend to be higher in sodium. Frozen dinners and some canned soups are common culprits. You should also avoid feeding your bird food that has caffeine, as this can damage their heart. Instead of letting your parrot sip your soda or coffee, share a fruit smoothie or vegetable juice with him.

5 Steps to Photographing Your Parrot

Possible FBPhotographing your parrot can be a fun way to preserve memories. As you watch your parrot’s cute antics on his/her bird stand or parrot playgym, you can’t help but want to capture that moment on camera. If you enjoy taking pictures, it is also a great way to expand your hobby. You can store these photos as keepsakes, send them to magazines, post them on your blog or enter them in pet photo contents. You can even showcase your bird photography at your local county fair or pet store bulletin board.

Here are a few steps to taking great pictures of your feathered friends:

Step #1: Select the Right Equipment

For best results, use a high-quality digital camera with a fast lens or shutter speed. If your camera pauses, or takes 3-4 seconds to snap a photo, you could miss the perfect pose. As your parrot is playing with his/her bird toys, or climbing around on his parrot playgym, he/she rarely sits still—so capturing the perfect photo requires a camera with fast action. You may also want a camera that has a telephoto lens. This will enable you to take detail-oriented pictures from a distance. At the very least, be sure your camera has a zoom feature. This will allow you to take “close-up” pictures without distorting your parrot’s face.

Step #2: Pick a Background

This is the fun part!! You can take pictures of your parrot on his bird stand,  or even outside. Try selecting a solid background that makes your bird stand-out. Avoid too much clutter such as laundry, dishes or a dirty birdcage. Make your parrot the center of the photo.

Step #3: Experiment with the Angle

In order to take a quality picture, every shot does not have to be head-on. Get creative and have fun experimenting with different angles. Try standing on a step-stool looking down at your bird; lie on the floor and look up, or squat to the side. The options are endless!!

Step #4: Use Natural Lighting

Soft, natural light is best when taking pictures of your parrot. If you are trying to snap a few shots of your parrot on his/her bird cage, open all the blinds/shades  and let the natural light flood the room. Avoid using a flash, if possible. The flash could scare your bird and can cause your bird’s eyes to look red in the photo. If you want to take pictures outside, try doing so on a cloudy or overcast day. If the sky is clear and the sun is out, take your photos in the early morning or later evening. The sunlight is much softer during these times and there will be fewer shadows.

Step #5: Get Your Parrot’s Attention

This can be a challenge. And you may only be able to hold their attention for a couple of seconds—which is why a fast-acting camera is essential. You can use various bird toys, or sounds to coax your parrot to look your way. When you have the perfect pose—snap the camera quickly!!!

Have fun and enjoy!!!

Ann
FunTime Birdy