Adopting a Rescue Bird

For Flapping FeathersParrots can make wonderful companions and pets. However, not everyone is cut out to be a bird owner. There is a lot of responsibility, dedication and cost involved. Being a good parrot owner entails more than simply feeding your bird every day and placing a couple of parrot toys  in their cage. Some people are not fully prepared for the demands of caring for a parrot before they rush out and buy one. As a result, many birds end up in shelters or rescues, looking for a new family. This is a sad situation for any bird, since rescue parrots can be hard to place.

There are many reasons people give up their parrots. These include:

•    Lack of Time: Most birds need more than a bird cage . They need human interaction. They need you to take them out of their cage and play with them on their parrot playgym or bird stand. They need your time and attention. With today’s hectic lifestyle, many people discover that they do not have time to care for a parrot.

•    Lack of Money: Parrots can be expensive to care for. If you have a large parrot, you will need to invest in a sizeable birdcage, which can be costly. Food, treats and parrot toys can also add up quickly. Not to mention trips to the veterinarian and any medications, vitamins or supplements your bird will need.

•    Life Changes: A move, new job or new baby can add up to a lot of demands, leaving little or no energy for a parrot.  If you are considering purchasing your first feathered friend, or if you simply want to add to your feathered flock, you may want to consider giving a dislocated parrot a good home. That being said—you should be prepared for the challenges of raising and caring for an adopted feathered friend. Not everyone is up for the task. Here are a few things to ask yourself:
•    Do you have a lot of patience? Oftentimes, rescue birds have been neglected and abused. As a result, they may have behavioral difficulties and trust issues. These parrots need a lot of time, attention and love to regain their trust in people. Initially, you may have to spend double the amount of time with a rescue parrot, as you would with one you already own. You may also need to help your feathered friend overcome behavioral issues such as feather-plucking, biting or constant screaming. This process will take time and patience.

•    Do you have experience with birds? The more experience and knowledge you have, the better. It will give you a tremendous edge when working with rescue birds. However, even if you are a new parrot owner, as long as you are dedicated, aware of the challenges and have experienced people to help you out, you will do fine.

Not all rescue birds are aggressive, sullen or mistrustful. Some come from good homes that simply cannot care for them anymore. However, you never know what you will get. Go in with both eyes open—be committed and willing to help the feathered friend you choose.

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